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Note: This post originally appeared in the monthly farm animal welfare newsletter written by Lewis Bollard, our program officer for farm animal welfare. Sign up here to receive an email each month with Lewis' research and insights into a farm animal advocacy research topic. We decided to cross-post this one because we thought it was especially interesting and wanted to make people aware of Lewis... Read More
Last year, the HistPhil blog put up a post by Tamara Mann Tweel about a now-published report we commissioned her to work on, regarding the Clinton Health Access Initiative (CHAI)'s role in global price drops for antiretroviral drugs (which can be crucial in treating HIV/AIDS). The HistPhil post states: Antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) went down from 10,000 – $15,000 per person per year to $140... Read More
Last year and the year before, we published a set of suggestions for individual donors looking for organizations to support. This year, we are repeating the practice and publishing updated suggestions from Open Philanthropy Project staff who chose to provide them. The same caveats as in previous years apply: These are reasonably strong options in causes of interest, and shouldn’t be taken as... Read More
As part of getting started in science funding, we’ve explored several different methods of finding high-impact giving opportunities, including scanning published research, networking in fields of interest, and considering proposals sent to us by people we know. We recently announced four grants totalling $10.8 million that represent another approach: piggybacking on a government grant program... Read More
For this post, some Open Phil staff members wrote up the thinking behind their personal donations for the year. Staff are listed in order of their start dates. You can click the below links to jump to a staff member's entry: Holden Karnofsky Alexander Berger Nick Beckstead Helen Toner Claire Zabel Lewis Bollard Ajeya Cotra Morgan Davis Michael Levine Holden Karnofsky I front-... Read More
We divide our scientific research funding into two categories: neglected goals and basic research. We believe that some research areas are underfunded because achieving the relevant research objectives is underrated by the "broad market" (according to our values). We call such research objectives "neglected goals." In 2014, we set a goal to be in a position to identify focus areas in science... Read More
Last year, we wrote: A major goal of 2017 will be to reach and publish better-developed views on: Which worldviews we find most plausible: for example, how we allocate resources between giving that primarily focuses on present-day human welfare vs. present-day animal welfare vs. global catastrophic risks. How we allocate resources among worldviews. How we determine whether it's better to... Read More
This post gives an update on our work with "external donors" - donors other than our current primary funders (Cari and Dustin). In brief: Over the long run, the Open Philanthropy Project aspires to work with many donors, and to affect far more giving than our current primary funders can do on their own, in order to maximize our impact and do as much good as possible. Outreach to donors other... Read More
This post aims to give blog readers and followers of the Open Philanthropy Project an opportunity to publicly raise comments or questions about the Open Philanthropy Project or related topics (in the comments section below). As always, you’re also welcome to email us at info@openphilanthropy.org if there’s feedback or questions you’d prefer to discuss privately. We’ll try to respond promptly to... Read More
This post aims to give blog readers and followers of the Open Philanthropy Project an opportunity to publicly raise comments or questions about the Open Philanthropy Project or related topics (in the comments section below). As always, you’re also welcome to email us at info@openphilanthropy.org if there’s feedback or questions you’d prefer to discuss privately. We’ll try to respond promptly to... Read More

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