Life Sciences Research Foundation — Young Investigators (2022)

Open Philanthropy recommended a grant of $751,000 to the Life Sciences Research Foundation to support early-career investigators. The funds will support four postdoctoral fellows for three years apiece. The fellows have proposed research projects investigating immunology, virology, and gastroenterology.

Fellows

Alexa Weingarden (Info)

Arthur Kim (Info)

Ian Boys (Info)

Tiago Bruno Rezende de Castro (Info)

 

This follows our April 2019 support and falls within our focus area of scientific research, specifically within our interest in advancing transformative basic science.

Life Sciences Research Foundation — Young Investigators (2021)

Open Philanthropy recommended a grant of $630,000 over three years to the Life Sciences Research Foundation to support early-career investigators. The funds will support three postdoctoral fellows for three years apiece. The fellows have proposed research projects investigating aspects of immunology.

This follows our May 2020 support and falls within our work on scientific research, specifically within our interest in advancing transformative basic science.

University of Pennsylvania — Research on Mammalian Reproduction (Kotaro Sasaki) (2020)


Grant investigators: Chris Somerville and Heather Youngs

This page was reviewed but not written by the grant investigators. University of Pennsylvania staff also reviewed this page prior to publication.


Open Philanthropy recommended a grant of $1,000,000 over four years to the University of Pennsylvania to support research by Professor Kotaro Sasaki on mammalian reproduction. Professor Sasaki’s research is focused on the development of gametes from stem cells.

Progress in this area could eventually enable people with fertility challenges to have children and could eventually help reduce the incidence of a wide variety of congenital diseases and promote other positive outcomes. Professor Sasaki’s research is among the most promising our science team has encountered so far in this field.

This follows our February 2019 support and falls within our work on scientific research, specifically within our interest in advancing transformative basic science.

University of New South Wales — In Vitro Fertilization Research (Robert Gilchrist)


Grant investigators: Heather Youngs and Chris Somerville

This page was reviewed but not written by the grant investigators. University of New South Wales staff also reviewed this page prior to publication.


Open Philanthropy recommended a grant of $2,500,000 over five years to the University of New South Wales to support research led by Professor Robert Gilchrist on in vitro maturation of oocytes. This funding is intended to support the development of improved methods for obtaining healthy, mature oocytes from women who intend to use in vitro fertilization to conceive.

This falls within our work on scientific research, specifically within our interest in advancing transformative basic science.

Life Sciences Research Foundation — Young Investigators (2020)


Grant investigators: Heather Youngs and Chris Somerville

This page was reviewed but not written by the grant investigator. Life Sciences Research Foundation staff also reviewed this page prior to publication.


Open Philanthropy recommended a grant of $585,000 to the Life Sciences Research Foundation to support early-career investigators. The funds will support three postdoctoral fellows for three years apiece. The fellows have proposed research projects investigating viral pathogenesis and the neural control of behavior.

This follows our April 2019 support. It falls within our work on scientific research, specifically within our interest in advancing transformative basic science.

Californians for Stem Cell Research, Treatments and Cures — California Institute for Regenerative Medicine


Grant investigator: Alexander Berger

This page was reviewed but not written by the grant investigator. Californians for Stem Cell Research, Treatments and Cures staff also reviewed this page prior to publication.


Open Philanthropy recommended a grant of $580,000 to Californians for Stem Cell Research, Treatments and Cures to support a ballot initiative to renew funding for the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM). CIRM is a bond-funded state agency that funds stem cell and genetic research focused on treatments and cures for chronic disease. Our science team believes that developing safe and effective stem cell treatments is an important area of research and has been impressed by CIRM’s past grants.

This falls within our work on scientific research, specifically within our interest in advancing transformative basic science.

Broad Institute — Genome Editing Research (Feng Zhang)

(Image courtesy of the Broad Institute.)

Grant Investigators: Chris Somerville and Heather Youngs

This page was reviewed but not written by the grant investigators. Broad Institute staff also reviewed this page prior to publication.


Open Philanthropy recommended a grant of $2,500,000 over three years to the Broad Institute to support exploratory research on new technologies for genome editing, led by Feng Zhang. Zhang is well-known for his research on the discovery and applications of CRISPR enzymes for genome editing, and plans to use these funds to support a series of experiments to try and discover better ways of getting CRISPR reagents into cells for gene therapy applications, and several other topics.

This falls within our work on scientific research, specifically within our interest in advancing transformative basic science.

University of Pennsylvania — Research on Mammalian Reproduction (Kotaro Sasaki) (2019)


Grant investigators: Chris Somerville and Heather Youngs

This page was reviewed but not written by the grant investigator. UPenn staff also reviewed this page prior to publication.


The Open Philanthropy Project recommended a grant of $660,000 over three years to the University of Pennsylvania to support research by Professor Kotaro Sasaki on mammalian reproduction. Dr. Sasaki’s proposed research would be specifically focused on development of gametes from stem cells.

Progress in this area could eventually enable people with fertility challenges to have children and could eventually help reduce the incidence of a wide variety of congenital diseases and promote other positive outcomes. Dr. Sasaki’s research is amongst the most promising our science team has encountered so far in this field.

This falls within our work on scientific research, specifically within our interest in advancing transformative basic science.

UC Berkeley — Aging Research (Irina Conboy) (2019)


Grant investigator: Heather Youngs

This page was reviewed but not written by the grant investigator. UC Berkeley staff also reviewed this page prior to publication.


The Open Philanthropy Project recommended a grant of $304,000 to UC Berkeley to support research on the impact of removing some blood constituents on indicators of aging in humans, led by Dr. Irina Conboy. Dr. Conboy and collaborators plan to conduct a small pilot medical trial of plasmapheresis, a procedure similar to dialysis that removes harmful antibodies from plasma.

This follows our August 2017 support, falls within our work on scientific research, specifically within our interest in advancing transformative basic science, and is a product of our investigation into research on the mechanisms of aging.