Disease and premature death are a major source of suffering. Treatments now potentially within reach may extend the human healthspan and improve quality of life. We aim to support tractable and cost-effective research on the world’s most burdensome diseases, including heart disease, cancer, malaria, and others. In addition to the grants listed here, Open Philanthropy Scientific Research staff advises Good Ventures on research related to Alzheimer’s disease.

Our Work

Press 11/2018
from The Economist

Target Malaria carries the prospect of huge humanitarian gains. It’s carefully designed, supported by Open Phil and the Gates Foundation, being carried out under international scrutiny, and gaining political support and inspiring a generation of researchers.

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Grant 7/2020
$2,000,000

Open Philanthropy recommended an investment in VST Bio to develop a novel treatment for stroke and traumatic brain disease.

Grant 7/2020
$330,000

Open Philanthropy recommended a grant over three years to two Rita Allen Foundation Award in Pain Scholars identified as excellent researchers in the fields of pain and anesthesiology.

Press 7/2020
from San Francisco Business Times

Kainomyx, which Open Philanthropy has invested in, is attacking a set of diseases that devastates developing countries but also carry risks to other nations with increased worldwide travel.

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Grant 5/2020
$1,999,999

Open Philanthropy recommended an investment in Kainomyx to develop and produce a new antimalarial drug.

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Grant 5/2020
$915,000

Open Philanthropy recommended a grant to Stanford University to support preclinical research on the development of a drug to cure chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections and prevent HBV-induced liver cancer, led by Professor Jeffrey Glenn.

Grant 4/2020
$2,500,000

Open Philanthropy recommended a grant over five years to the African Union Development Agency to support the evaluation, preparation, and potential deployment of genetically-based vector control technologies to help eliminate malaria in some African regions.

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Grant 3/2020
$8,293,676

Open Philanthropy recommended a grant over six years to Stanford University to augment the National Institutes of Health’s studies on the infant immunome and influenza.

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