Disease and premature death are a major source of suffering. Treatments now potentially within reach may extend the human healthspan and improve quality of life. We aim to support tractable and cost-effective research on the world’s most burdensome diseases, including heart disease, cancer, malaria, and others. In addition to the grants listed here, Open Philanthropy Scientific Research staff advises Good Ventures on research related to Alzheimer’s disease.

Our Work

Press 11/2018
from The Economist

Target Malaria carries the prospect of huge humanitarian gains. It’s carefully designed, supported by Open Phil and the Gates Foundation, being carried out under international scrutiny, and gaining political support and inspiring a generation of researchers.

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Grant 11/2020
$2,199,645

Open Philanthropy recommended a grant to the International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology to support research on the potential effectiveness of a naturally occurring microsporidian species in preventing the transmission of malaria from mosquitoes to humans.

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Grant 11/2020
$5,300,000

Open Philanthropy recommended a grant to the Telethon Kids Institute to support work led by Professor Jonathan Carapetis to develop a Strep A vaccine.

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Grant 11/2020
$5,550,000

Open Philanthropy recommended an investment in VasoRX to continue work testing a new therapy for vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and pulmonary arterial hypertension.

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Grant 11/2020
$1,004,589

Open Philanthropy recommended a grant to Washington University in St. Louis to support research led by Professor David Sibley on Cryptosporidium hominis.

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Grant 11/2020
$450,000

Open Philanthropy recommended a grant to Yale University to support research on the development of RNA interference (RNAi) therapies for cardiovascular diseases.

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Grant 10/2020
$99,000

Open Philanthropy recommended a grant to UC Berkeley to support work led by Amy Pickering to develop low-cost in-line water chlorination devices.

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Grant 10/2020
$3,175,000

Open Philanthropy recommended a grant to the University of Glasgow to support research on the potential effectiveness of a naturally occurring microsporidian species in preventing the transmission of malaria from mosquitoes to humans.

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