Many of the most impactful discoveries in the history of science have been novel, pathbreaking findings that enabled subsequent exploration of whole new areas. We aim to fund basic science that could end up playing that enabling role when we see it as neglected by other potential funders.

Our Work

Blog Post 4/2015

Research that achieves broadly applicable insights about biological processes and brings on many new promising directions for research is difficult to be assured of “results” in the sense of new clinical applications.

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Grant 12/2020
$1,000,000

Open Philanthropy recommended a grant to the University of Pennsylvania to support research by Professor Kotaro Sasaki on mammalian reproduction.

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Grant 11/2020
$2,500,000

Open Philanthropy recommended a grant to the University of New South Wales to support research led by Professor Robert Gilchrist on in vitro maturation of oocytes.

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Grant 5/2020
$585,000

Open Philanthropy recommended a grant to the Life Sciences Research Foundation to support early-career investigators.

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Grant 4/2020
$580,000

Open Philanthropy recommended a grant to Californians for Stem Cell Research, Treatments and Cures to support a ballot initiative to renew funding for the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine.

Grant 12/2019
$2,500,000

The Zhang Lab at the Broad Institute is researching better ways of getting CRISPR reagents into cells for gene therapy applications, amongst other topics.

Press 10/2019
from Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News

Scientists at Arizona State University’s Biodesign Institute we supported have identified more than 200,000 cancer neoantigens, which could feasibly lead to the development of broad-spectrum cancer vaccines, as well as tumor type-specific treatments or patient-personalized vaccines.

Press 9/2019
from Nature

In a small trial, drugs seemed to rejuvenate the body’s ‘epigenetic clock’, which tracks a person’s biological age. The research was conducted by UCLA’s Steve Horvath, whose work we have supported.

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