Florida Rights Restoration Coalition — General Support (2020)

(Image courtesy of FRRC.)

Grant investigator: Chloe Cockburn

This page was reviewed but not written by the grant investigator. Florida Rights Restoration Coalition staff also reviewed this page prior to publication.


Open Philanthropy recommended two grants totaling $500,000 to the Florida Rights Restoration Coalition (FRRC), via the Tides Foundation, for general support. FRRC worked to build support for Amendment 4, the 2018 ballot initiative that restored voting rights to formerly incarcerated people in Florida. This funding will enable FRRC to hire additional canvassers and continue to conduct outreach to formerly incarcerated people across the state.

This follows our February 2017 support and falls within our focus area of criminal justice reform.

Florida Rights Restoration Coalition — Power Building (2017)

Grant investigator: Chloe Cockburn

This page was reviewed but not written by the grant investigator. FRRC staff also reviewed this page prior to publication.

The Open Philanthropy Project recommended a grant of $558,000 to the Florida Rights Restoration Coalition (FRRC) via The Advocacy Fund to support power-building work. FRRC is led by Desmond Meade, a formerly incarcerated advocate and organizer who is chair of the sponsorship campaign for the 2018 Florida Voting Rights Restoration for Felons ballot initiative.1 This grant is intended to allow FRRC to increase its organizing and movement-building capacity in Florida ahead of the ballot initiative, particularly by mobilizing returning citizens. Specifically, FRRC will use these funds to: launch regional chapters; hire fellows, organizing staff, and support staff; recruit local leaders and volunteers; launch leadership development and organizing training; and conduct public education and engagement campaigns advocating for the restoration of voting rights for returning citizens. Additionally, FRRC will use part of these funds to make a sub-grant to Organize Florida.

We have previously supported the FRRC with general support grants in August 2016 and February 2017. Our Program Officer for Criminal Justice Reform, Chloe Cockburn, considers Desmond a talented and committed leader, and while she would like to see the ballot initiative pass, primarily views this grant as a way to strengthen FRRC’s long-term position as a central voice in the criminal justice reform movement in Florida.

This grant was made by a 501(c)(4) social welfare organization, to which we occasionally make funding recommendations.

This is a discretionary grant, and falls within our focus area of criminal justice reform.

Sources

DOCUMENT SOURCE
Ballotpedia, October 2017 [archive only] Source

Florida Rights Restoration Coalition — General Support

Published: March 2017

The Open Philanthropy Project recommended a grant of $130,000 to the Florida Rights Restoration Coalition (FRRC), a small organization focused on voter turnout and voting rights, for general support. FRRC plans to use this grant to hire a deputy and an administrative staff member. FRRC has spent several years working to build support for a ballot initiative to restore voting rights to formerly incarcerated people in Florida, and we hope that this grant will enable it to do this work more effectively.

We previously recommended a grant to FRRC in August 2016.

This is a discretionary (formerly called “no-process”) grant. For discretionary grants, the grant investigator (in this case Chloe Cockburn, our Program Officer for Criminal Justice Reform) can recommend the grant without needing to go through our normal process of providing their reasoning, discussing with the team, and providing input on and review of our public page. These grants are limited to a relatively small proportion of our grantmaking, and some other stipulations apply to what types of grant are eligible. The overall aim is for us to be able to move forward on relatively small and low-risk grants, based purely on the judgment of a single staff member and with minimal delay.

Florida Rights Restoration Coalition — General Support

Published: October 2016

The Open Philanthropy Project recommended a grant of $48,000 via the New Florida Majority Education Fund to the Florida Rights Restoration Coalition, for general support including education of its members and networks on the role of prosecutors.

This is a “no-process” grant. For no-process grants, the grant investigator (in this case Chloe Cockburn, our Program Officer for Criminal Justice Reform) can recommend the grant without needing to go through our normal process of providing their reasoning, discussing with the team, and providing input on and review of our public page. These grants are limited to a relatively small proportion of our grantmaking, and some other stipulations apply to what types of grant are eligible. The overall aim is for us to be able to move forward on relatively small and low-risk grants, based purely on the judgment of a single staff member and with minimal delay. In keeping with the lack of process, we don’t plan to publish in-depth pages about the reasoning behind these grants.