Food and Agriculture Research — Keel Bone Damage Reduction

Open Philanthropy recommended a grant of $3,000,000 over five years to the Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research (FFAR) to support a request for proposals for projects to reduce the global incidence of keel bone damage in layer hens. This kind of damage causes severe chronic pain for 30 to 100 percent of the world’s 7 billion layer hens.

This follows our April 2017 support and falls within our focus area of farm animal welfare.

Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research — Plant Protein Optimization Research


Grant investigators: Chris Somerville and Lewis Bollard

This page was reviewed but not written by the grant investigator. Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research (FFAR) staff also reviewed this page prior to publication.


Open Philanthropy recommended a grant of $250,000 over three years to the Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research (FFAR) to support research on optimizing plant protein for use in plant-based meat. This funding is intended to support protein optimization in chickpeas, led by NuCicer. The project was submitted as part of FFAR’s request for proposals, which we co-funded in April 2020.

This falls within our focus areas of scientific research and represents a match of a similar grant from the farm animal welfare program.

Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research — Chickpea and Corn Zein Research


Grant investigators: Chris Somerville and Lewis Bollard

This page was reviewed but not written by the grant investigator. Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research (FFAR) staff also reviewed this page prior to publication.


Open Philanthropy recommended a grant of $444,000 over three years to the Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research (FFAR) to support research on optimizing plant protein for use in plant-based meat. This funding is intended to support protein optimization in chickpeas, led by NuCicer, and research into improving corn zein’s functionality for plant-based meat, led by Professor Bruce Hamaker of Purdue University. Both projects were submitted as part of FFAR’s request for proposals, which we co-funded in April 2020.

This falls within our focus areas of farm animal welfare. The chickpea portion of this research represents a match of a similar grant from the scientific research program.

Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research — Research on Drought-Tolerant Rice


Grant Investigators: Chris Somerville and Heather Youngs

This page was reviewed but not written by the grant investigators. Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research staff also reviewed this page prior to publication.


Open Philanthropy recommended a grant of $122,500 over three years to support work on CRISPR modifications to increase drought tolerance in Indian rice, a project led by Professor Brian Staskawicz at UC Berkeley. It’s our understanding that sporadic drought has caused Indian rice yields to become erratic, which has negative impacts on the livelihood of about 100 million small farmers. The proposed experiments will exploit recent advances in genome editing. The Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research (FFAR) plans to match our support, and we intend this funding to support the research of PhD student Nicholas Karavolias. A portion of the funding supports Nicholas’s inclusion in the FFAR Fellows Program, a three-year leadership and professional development program for 22 PhD students in the agricultural and life sciences.

This follows our October 2018 support to UC Berkeley and falls within our work on scientific research.

 

The grant amount was updated in May 2022.

Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research — Farm Animal Welfare Research (2020)

(Image courtesy of FFAR.)

Grant investigator: Lewis Bollard

This page was reviewed but not written by the grant investigator. FFAR staff also reviewed this page prior to publication.


Open Philanthropy recommended a grant of $500,000 to the Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research to co-fund a request for proposals for research on optimizing plant protein for use in plant-based meat. The resulting research could eventually improve the quality and lower the costs of plant-based meat.

This follows our December 2018 support and falls within our focus area of farm animal welfare.

Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research — Egg Tech Challenge

Grant investigator: Lewis Bollard

This page was reviewed but not written by the grant investigator. FFAR staff also reviewed this page prior to publication.

The Open Philanthropy Project recommended a grant of up to $3,000,000 to the Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research (FFAR) to support research into, and a prize for, developing a technology that can sex select male chicks at scale in ovo, eliminating the need for chick culling. This funding includes approximately $2,000,000 for FFAR to support research teams to compete for the prize, and approximately $1,000,000 for the prize itself, which will be awarded only if certain conditions are met.

Lewis Bollard, our Program Officer for Farm Animal Welfare, believes this technology will end the acute suffering at death of ~6.5 billion chicks per year and will spare ~29 million hens per year from factory farming entirely because the aborted eggs will replace their output in the market.

This follows our April 2017 grant to FFAR to support research to find solutions to bone fractures in cage-free hens and painful castration in piglets and falls within our focus area of farm animal welfare.

Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research — Farm Animal Welfare Research (2017)

Published: May 2017
Grant investigator: Lewis Bollard
This page was reviewed but not written by the grant investigator. FFAR staff also reviewed this page prior to publication.

The Open Philanthropy Project recommended a grant of $1 million to the Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research (FFAR) to co-fund requests for applications (RFAs) for research on solutions to what we see as two major problems in farm animal welfare: bone fractures in cage-free hens and the painful castration of male piglets. It is our impression that both of these problems are scientifically tractable. FFAR plans to use this grant and at least $1 million of its own funding to fund scientific projects focused on solving these problems.

We are excited about this grant because a) we believe that it is an efficient way to fund research on farm animal welfare, since FFAR is co-funding the research and plans to handle the logistics of the RFAs and distribute the results of its research among industry, b) it is an opportunity for us to learn about co-funding with a Congressionally created and funded 501(c)(3) organization, which we believe could be a useful avenue for funding research to solve other problems in farm animal welfare, and c) it may increase FFAR’s interest in co-funding other animal welfare projects.

Sources

Document Source
Foundation for Food and Agriculture Request for Applications Source