Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition — Universal Salt Iodization (January 2021)

Open Philanthropy recommended a grant of $50,000 to the Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN) to support its Universal Salt Iodization program, due to its status as a GiveWell standout charity. We followed the recommendation of GiveWell staff regarding how to allocate grantmaking between GiveWell standout charities.

Read GiveWell’s review of GAIN’s Universal Salt Iodization program to learn more about the charity’s activities and follow its progress.

Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition — Universal Salt Iodization (January 2020)

Open Philanthropy recommended a grant of $100,000 to the Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN) to support its Universal Salt Iodization program, due to its status as a GiveWell standout charity. We followed the recommendation of GiveWell staff regarding how to allocate grantmaking between GiveWell standout charities.

Read GiveWell’s review of GiveWell’s review of GAIN’s Universal Salt Iodization program to learn more about the charity’s activities and follow its progress.

Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition — Universal Salt Iodization (December 2018)

 

The Open Philanthropy Project recommended a grant of $100,000 to the Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN) to support its Universal Salt Iodization program, due to its status as a GiveWell standout charity. We followed the recommendation of GiveWell staff regarding how to allocate grantmaking between GiveWell standout charities.

Read GiveWell’s review of GAIN’s Universal Salt Iodization program to learn more about the charity’s activities and follow its progress.

Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition — Universal Salt Iodization (December 2017)

The Open Philanthropy Project recommended a grant of $100,000 to the Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN) to support its Universal Salt Iodization program, due to its status as a GiveWell standout charity. We followed the recommendation of GiveWell staff regarding how to allocate grantmaking between GiveWell standout charities.

Read GiveWell’s review of GAIN’s Universal Salt Iodization program to learn more about the charity’s activities and follow its progress.

Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition — Universal Salt Iodization (January 2017)

Salt in many countries is supplied by evaporating seawater in salt ponds. The Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition supports salt iodization by providing supply-side technical assistance to industry and government. (Photo courtesy of GAIN)

Published: April 2017

Note: This grant was awarded while the Open Philanthropy Project was a partnership between GiveWell and Good Ventures.

Good Ventures awarded a grant of $250,000 to the Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN) for its Universal Salt Iodization program in January 2017, in recognition of the program’s earning a “standout charity” ranking from GiveWell in 2016.

See GiveWell’s review of GAIN’s Universal Salt Iodization program to learn more about the charity’s activities and follow its progress.

ClimateWorks Foundation — Kigali Cooling Efficiency Program

Published: March 2017

Grant investigator: Claire Zabel

This page was reviewed but not written by the grant investigator.

The Open Philanthropy Project recommended a grant of $3 million to ClimateWorks to contribute to the Kigali Cooling Efficiency Program, which was created recently to assist with a phase-down of the use of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) in developing nations, in connection with the passing of an amendment to the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer.

The Montreal Protocol is an international treaty signed in 1987 that aimed to phase out the use of substances that damage the ozone layer. More recently, it has become clear that HFCs, which have been used to replace the ozone-damaging substances targeted by the Montreal Protocol, are themselves extremely potent greenhouse gases. In recognition of this, in 2016 an effort was made to amend the Montreal Protocol to include a phase-out of HFCs. This grant is contributing to a pool of funding provided by a group of philanthropic organizations and individuals to support energy efficiency initiatives in developing countries transitioning to HFC alternatives. Our goal was to incentivize countries in the developing world to agree to a more ambitious phase-out timeline and to assist them in achieving the proposed timeline.1

In October 2016, one month after this funding was committed, a version of the proposed amendment was passed.2

Sources

DOCUMENT SOURCE
Hewlett Foundation, press release October 17, 2016 Source (archive)
White House Office of the Press Secretary, press release September 22, 2016 Source (archive)

Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition — General Support (October 2015)

Salt is produced in the Philippines by evaporating seawater in salt ponds. The Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition supports salt processors in the Philippines by providing training and equipment. (Photo courtesy of GAIN)

 

Note: This grant was awarded while the Open Philanthropy Project was a partnership between GiveWell and Good Ventures.

Good Ventures awarded a grant of $250,000 to the Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN) for its Universal Salt Iodization program in October 2015, in recognition of GAIN’s “standout charity” ranking from GiveWell in 2015. See GiveWell’s review of GAIN for more about its activities and to follow its progress.

Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition — General Support (December 2014)

Salt is produced in the Philippines by evaporating seawater in salt ponds. The Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition supports salt processors in the Philippines by providing training and equipment. (Photo courtesy of GAIN)

 

Note: This grant was awarded while the Open Philanthropy Project was a partnership between GiveWell and Good Ventures.


Good Ventures awarded a grant of $250,000 to the Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN) for its Universal Salt Iodization program in December 2014, in recognition of the program’s earning a “standout charity” ranking from GiveWell in 2014. The grant was made via GiveWell. See GiveWell’s review of GAIN for more about its activities and to follow its progress.