UC Berkeley — Alternative Meats Lab (2021)

Open Philanthropy recommended a grant of $1,146,201 over two years to UC Berkeley to support the Alternative Meats Lab (Alt:Meat Lab), housed at The Sutardja Center for Entrepreneurship and Technology. Since our October 2019 support, Alt:Meat Lab has incubated a number of new startups developing alternatives to animal products and has helped build the talent pipeline for existing companies working in this space. This funding is intended to enable Alt:Meat Lab to continue its startup incubation and pipeline-building efforts and to expand its educational offerings at UC Berkeley.

This falls within our focus area of farm animal welfare.

UC Berkeley — Air Quality Sensors in South Asia


Grant investigators: Zachary Robinson and Alexander Berger

This page was reviewed but not written by the grant investigators. UC Berkeley staff also reviewed this page prior to publication.


Open Philanthropy recommended a grant of $700,000 to UC Berkeley to enable Professor Joshua Apte to collaborate with the Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IIT Delhi) and the Council on Energy, Environment, and Water (CEEW) to install a network of low-cost air quality sensors in South Asia and conduct research and policy outreach on their use. The area that the air quality sensors will monitor has some of the worst air quality in the world. IIT Delhi, CEEW, and Professor Apte intend to use the data they collect from the air quality sensors to inform policies that address air pollution in South Asia.

This falls within our focus area of global health and development. For more about our strategy in this area, read our South Asian air quality cause report.

UC Berkeley — Adversarial Robustness Research (Dawn Song)


Grant Investigator: Catherine Olsson and Daniel Dewey

This page was reviewed but not written by the grant investigators. UC Berkeley staff also reviewed this page prior to publication.


Open Philanthropy recommended a grant of $330,000 over three years to UC Berkeley to support research by Professor Dawn Song on adversarial robustness as a means to improve AI safety.

This falls within our focus area of potential risks from advanced artificial intelligence.

UC Berkeley — Adversarial Robustness Research (David Wagner)


Grant Investigator: Catherine Olsson and Daniel Dewey

This page was reviewed but not written by the grant investigators. UC Berkeley staff also reviewed this page prior to publication.


Open Philanthropy recommended a grant of $330,000 over three years to UC Berkeley to support research by Professor David Wagner on adversarial robustness as a means to improve AI safety.

This falls within our focus area of potential risks from advanced artificial intelligence.

UC Berkeley — Center for Human-Compatible Artificial Intelligence (2021)


Grant investigator: Nick Beckstead

This page was reviewed but not written by the grant investigator. UC Berkeley staff also reviewed this page prior to publication.


Open Philanthropy recommended a grant of $11,355,246 over five years to UC Berkeley to support the Center for Human-Compatible Artificial Intelligence (CHAI). The multi-year commitment and increased funding will enable CHAI to expand its research and student training related to potential risks from advanced artificial intelligence.

This is a renewal of our August 2016 grant.

UC Berkeley — In-Line Water Chlorination Devices (Amy Pickering)


Grant investigators: Chris Somerville and Heather Youngs

This page was reviewed but not written by the grant investigators. UC Berkeley staff also reviewed this page prior to publication.


Open Philanthropy recommended a grant of $99,000 to UC Berkeley to support work led by Amy Pickering to develop low-cost in-line water chlorination devices. Such devices could improve drinking water quality in low-resource settings and lessen the burden of diarrheal disease.

This falls within our work on scientific research, specifically within our interest in advancing human health and wellbeing.

UC Berkeley — Assessing COVID-19 Infection Prevalence in Rural Kenya (Amy Pickering and Michael Kremer)

The UC Berkeley project aims to assess the prevalence of COVID-19 infections in rural Kenya. (Photo courtesy of UC Berkeley.)

Grant investigator: Chris Somerville and Heather Youngs

This page was reviewed but not written by the grant investigators. UC Berkeley staff also reviewed this page prior to publication.


Open Philanthropy recommended a grant of $220,000 over two years to UC Berkeley to support a project led by Professors Amy Pickering and Michael Kremer to assess the prevalence of COVID-19 infections in rural Kenya. The project will survey a subset of 14,000 households across 240 villages in order to estimate asymptomatic and symptomatic cumulative population infection prevalence by age group, generate data to inform estimates of the effective reproductive number (Rt) in the study area, identify risk factors for infection, and assess the utility of mobile phone surveys as a low-cost surveillance tool.

This falls within our work on scientific research, specifically within our interest in science supporting biosecurity and pandemic preparedness.