Institute for Progress — Policy Research

Grant investigator: Jacob Trefethen


This page was reviewed but not written by the grant investigator. Institute for Progress staff also reviewed this page prior to publication.


Open Philanthropy recommended a grant of $1,600,000 over one and a half years to the Institute for Progress, a new think tank, to conduct research and advocacy on policies relevant to a number of our grantmaking areas, including immigration policy and scientific research.

International Refugee Assistance Project — General Support (2020)

Kristine Rembach from IRAP meets with children at a reception center in Ethiopia to learn about the needs of unaccompanied child refugees and how they might benefit from our family reunification programming. (Photo courtesy of IRAP.)

Grant investigator: Zachary Robinson

This page was reviewed but not written by the grant investigator. IRAP staff also reviewed this page prior to publication.


Open Philanthropy recommended a grant of $1,000,000 over two years to the International Refugee Assistance Project (IRAP) for general support. You can read more about our rationale for supporting IRAP on the page for our first grant to them in 2016.

This follows our January 2019 support and falls within our focus area of immigration policy.

Labor Mobility Partnerships — International Labor Mobility


Grant investigator: Zachary Robinson and Alexander Berger

This page was reviewed but not written by the grant investigators. Labor Mobility Partnerships staff also reviewed this page prior to publication.


Open Philanthropy recommended a grant of $500,000 to Labor Mobility Partnerships (LaMP) to support work to enhance international labor mobility. LaMP aims to ensure workers can access employment opportunities abroad. It focuses on connecting governments, employers, researchers, and advocates to bridge gaps in international labor markets, and creating and curating resources to design and implement mobility partnerships.

This follows our March 2019 support and represents an “exit grant” that will provide LaMP with approximately one year of operating support. It falls within our focus area of immigration policy.

Mercy Corps — Seasonal Migration Pilot Project and RCT

Mercy Corps staff work alongside community members and leaders, solving the challenges most pressing for them. Here, a family in Zinder, Niger, discusses family dynamics. (Photo courtesy of Mercy Corps.)

Grant Investigators: Zachary Robinson and Alexander Berger

This page was reviewed but not written by the grant investigators. Mercy Corps staff also reviewed this page prior to publication.


Open Philanthropy recommended a grant of $1,000,000 over two years to Mercy Corps, in partnership with the Immigration Policy Lab at Stanford University, to conduct a pilot project with a randomized control trial (RCT) on seasonal migration for rural Nigeriens. The project and the RCT will examine the drivers and returns to seasonal migration, and will subsidize the transportation of underemployed men in the rural Tillabéri region to urban centers in Niger and surrounding countries.

This falls within our focus area of immigration policy.

Niskanen Center — Research on Immigration Policy (2020)


Grant investigator: Alexander Berger

This page was reviewed but not written by the grant investigator. Niskanen Center staff also reviewed this page prior to publication.


Open Philanthropy recommended a grant of $200,000 to the Niskanen Center to support its work on immigration policy. The Niskanen Center, a libertarian think tank, seeks to reduce barriers to immigration by developing and disseminating information, arguments, and policy ideas.

This follows our January 2018 support and falls within our focus area of immigration policy. It represents an “exit grant” that will provide the Niskanen Center immigration team with an additional year of support.

Center for Global Development — Migration Program (2020)


Grant investigators: Alexander Berger and Zachary Robinson

This page was reviewed but not written by the grant investigators. Center for Global Development staff also reviewed this page prior to publication.


Open Philanthropy recommended a grant of $1,000,000 over three years to the Center for Global Development to support its migration program, led by Dr. Michael Clemens. We approached renewal somewhat differently than we had expected to in our 2017 grant page: this funding includes one additional year at the previous funding level and two subsequent years at a funding level that we believe may be more sustainable for the long run. This funding is intended to support Dr. Clemens’s ongoing research and policy work on immigration.

International Refugee Assistance Project — Family Reunification

(Photo courtesy of IRAP.)

Grant investigator: Alexander Berger

This page was reviewed but not written by the grant investigator. International Refugee Assistance Project staff also reviewed this page prior to publication.


The Open Philanthropy Project recommended a grant of $75,000 to the International Refugee Assistance Project (IRAP) to support a family reunification pilot project. IRAP intends to try to reunite approximately 125 refugee children with their families.

This is a discretionary grant, that follows our January 2019 grant, and falls within our focus area of immigration policy, one of our focus areas within U.S. policy.

Center for Global Development — Labor Mobility Partnerships

Grant investigator: Alexander Berger

This page was reviewed but not written by the grant investigator. Center for Global Development staff also reviewed this page prior to publication.

The Open Philanthropy Project recommended a grant of $709,888 over 1.5 years to the Center for Global Development to support a working group on and incubation of a new organization aimed at enhancing international labor mobility. The new organization, called LaMP (Labor Mobility Partnerships), hopes to assist countries negotiating new legal channels for migration on terms of mutual benefit and to generate research and evidence on effective labor mobility regimes, in the ultimate service of reducing global poverty and inequality. Rebekah Smith and Lant Pritchett, who will be working together on the incubation and launch, proposed the idea for this type of organization in a 2016 CGD working paper.

This grant follows previous support to the Center for Global Development’s migration program in March 2014 and March 2017, and falls within our focus area of immigration policy.